How To Get a Job in Australia (Plus Latest POEA Jobs)

Thinking of finding a job in Australia? Well, you can learn from the others that came before you.

Many Filipinos now call Australia their home. In fact, they are the fifth largest migrant community group1 in Australia according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics. There were about 310,000 Filipinos in Australia in 2020, growing by 28.5% from 2015.

According to 2016-2020 data from the Australian Department of Home Affairs2, many Filipinos had found jobs there as registered nurses, motor mechanics, welders, and cooks. But when COVID-19 hit, Australia closed its borders.

Now that Australia’s borders are slowly being reopened3, migrant workers are also expected to grow in number to help address labor shortages in the country.

If you are looking for an opportunity to find work in Australia, now would be a good time to start your preparations with the help of this guide. 

 

Table of Contents

 

At a Glance: The Latest POEA Jobs in Australia for Filipinos (Updated Weekly)

Below is a list of job opportunities available in Australia through recruitment agencies with valid POEA licenses. This list will continuously be updated weekly so make sure to bookmark this page. The jobs and agencies have been verified through the POEA database but make sure to validate them yourself as their status may change without notice.

For more details about each of the jobs listed below, please go to this page: POEA-Licensed Philippine Agencies for Australia (With Latest Job Orders)

PositionPOEA-Licensed AgencyDate Posted
Heavy Equipment Mechanic (Hydraulic & Electrical)QRD International Placement Inc. (License valid until November 6, 2023)September 29, 2022
Isuzu TechniciansQRD International Placement Inc. (License valid until November 6, 2023)September 29, 2022
Restaurant Manager – (McDonald)Multi-Orient Manpower & Management Services Inc. (License valid until February 26, 2024)September 29, 2022
HDPE Welder (Experience in Geomembrane Liners)Multi-Orient Manpower & Management Services Inc. (License valid until February 26, 2024)September 29, 2022
Chef De Partie, Sous Chef, Executive ChefMulti-Orient Manpower & Management Services Inc. (License valid until February 26, 2024)September 28, 2022
Chopper Gun OperatorCirrus Global Inc. (Formerly International Quality Manpower Services Inc.) (License valid until September 15, 2023)September 28, 2022
Auto Glaziers (Window Tint Installer)Cirrus Global Inc. (Formerly International Quality Manpower Services Inc.) (License valid until September 15, 2023)September 28, 2022
Truck MechanicCirrus Global Inc. (Formerly International Quality Manpower Services Inc.) (License valid until September 15, 2023)September 28, 2022
Heavy Diesel MechanicCirrus Global Inc. (Formerly International Quality Manpower Services Inc.) (License valid until September 15, 2023)September 28, 2022
Chefs (Western Cuisines)Cirrus Global Inc. (Formerly International Quality Manpower Services Inc.) (License valid until September 15, 2023)September 28, 2022
MachinistVFG International Placement Inc. (License valid until June 23, 2024)September 28, 2022
Blaster PainterVFG International Placement Inc. (License valid until June 23, 2024)September 28, 2022
Fabricator Welders (FCAW, MIG)VFG International Placement Inc. (License valid until June 23, 2024)September 28, 2022
Metal Machinists (1st Class)Al-Kingsmen International Manpower Services Co. (License valid until October 14, 2023)September 28, 2022
Draftsman / Auto CADDCaves Treasures Manpower & Construction Corporation (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 27, 2022
Truck Mechanic (Hino/Fuso/Isuzu/Volvo)Caves Treasures Manpower & Construction Corporation (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 27, 2022
ArboristCaves Treasures Manpower & Construction Corporation (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 27, 2022
Carpenter / Floor FinisherVFG International Placement Inc. (License valid until June 23, 2024)September 26, 2022
Diesel MechanicYWA Human Resource Corporation (Formerly Yangwha Human Resource Corporation) (License valid until November 11, 2022)September 26, 2022
Panel BeatersAl-Kingsmen International Manpower Services Co. (License valid until October 14, 2023)September 23, 2022
Metal FabricatorsAl-Kingsmen International Manpower Services Co. (License valid until October 14, 2023)September 23, 2022
Vehicle Spray PaintersAl-Kingsmen International Manpower Services Co. (License valid until October 14, 2023)September 23, 2022
Butcher/Slaughter Interasia Outsource Inc. (License valid until June 19, 2023)September 20, 2022
BricklayerCPL Masters Recruitment Agency Inc. (License valid until June 23, 2024)September 20, 2022
TilerCPL Masters Recruitment Agency Inc. (License valid until June 23, 2024)September 20, 2022
CarpenterCPL Masters Recruitment Agency Inc. (License valid until June 23, 2024)September 20, 2022
ConcreterCPL Masters Recruitment Agency Inc. (License valid until June 23, 2024)September 20, 2022
WelderCPL Masters Recruitment Agency Inc. (License valid until June 23, 2024)September 20, 2022
PlumberCPL Masters Recruitment Agency Inc. (License valid until June 23, 2024)September 20, 2022
PainterCPL Masters Recruitment Agency Inc. (License valid until June 23, 2024)September 20, 2022
ElectricianCPL Masters Recruitment Agency Inc. (License valid until June 23, 2024)September 20, 2022
Heavy Duty Diesel MechanicCirrus Global Inc. (Formerly International Quality Manpower Services Inc.) (License valid until September 15, 2023)September 20, 2022
Maintenance FitterH.M.O. International Human Resources (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 20, 2022
Stainless Steel (TIG Welder)H.M.O. International Human Resources (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 20, 2022
Mill OperatorH.M.O. International Human Resources (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 19, 2022
ChefH.M.O. International Human Resources (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 19, 2022
Welder / Fabricator (Kitchen Fabricator MIG/TIG)Caves Treasures Manpower & Construction Corporation (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 19, 2022
Motorcycle MechanicCaves Treasures Manpower & Construction Corporation (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 19, 2022
Driller FitterCaves Treasures Manpower & Construction Corporation (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 19, 2022
Forklift MechanicCaves Treasures Manpower & Construction Corporation (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 19, 2022
Small Engine / Motorcycle MechanicCaves Treasures Manpower & Construction Corporation (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 19, 2022
Tractor MechanicCaves Treasures Manpower & Construction Corporation (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 19, 2022
Auto Electrician (Mobile Mining Experience)Caves Treasures Manpower & Construction Corporation (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 19, 2022
HE Mechanic (Cat / Komatsu)Caves Treasures Manpower & Construction Corporation (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 19, 2022
Heavy Duty Diesel MechanicCaves Treasures Manpower & Construction Corporation (License valid until January 1, 2023)September 19, 2022
AWP Service TechnicianCirrus Global Inc. (Formerly International Quality Manpower Services Inc.) (License valid until September 15, 2023)September 19, 2022
CNC MachinistPower Horizon International Resources Inc. (License valid until December 9, 2022)September 19, 2022
CarpentersPower Horizon International Resources Inc. (License valid until December 9, 2022)September 19, 2022
 

Top 10 Most-In Demand Jobs in Australia for Filipinos

The Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) validates job orders from Australia and other countries to ensure that the rights of OFWs are protected. They maintain a database of these validated jobs and update the list regularly. 

The list below shows the top 10 most in-demand jobs in Australia for Filipinos based on the POEA database 2021-2022.

job hiring in australia for filipino

1. Welders, Fabricators & Other Metal Workers

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Job Overview: Structural steel and welding trades workers4 are adept in repairing, cutting, and joining metal for boilers, pipes, ships, and other structures. Their tasks include studying blueprints, cutting metal, aligning parts, and finishing iron and steel products.

Average Salary:  

  • Welders – $35.73/hr (in AUD, based on data from SalaryExpert5
  • Metal Fabricator – $39.98/hr 
  • Boilermaker – $50.06/hr 

Requirements: 

  • Equivalent of AQF Certificate III including at least two years of on-the-job training; or AQF Certificate IV; or at least 3 years of equivalent experience in the same field 
  • Some employers may require relevant experience or on-the-job training in addition to the formal qualification 

Job Variations: Fabricator General, Fabricator Metal, Fabricator Welding, Boilermaker, Welder Coded, Welder Fitter, Welder Pressure, Welder First Class, Welder Special Class 

2. Automotive Mechanics & Electricians

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Job Overview: Automotive mechanics and electricians6 are skilled workers who repair and maintain large and small vehicles such as cars, trucks, and motorcycles. Automotive mechanics mainly handle mechanical systems such as engines and tires while automotive electricians diagnose and repair the various electrical systems in vehicles. 

Average Salary:  

  • Automotive Mechanic & Electrician – $32.57/hr 

Requirements: 

  • Equivalent of AQF Certificate III including at least two years of on-the-job training; or AQF Certificate IV; or at least 3 years of equivalent experience in the same field 
  • Professional registration or licensing may be required 
  • Some employers may require relevant experience or on-the-job training in addition to the formal qualification 

Job Variations: Mechanic Diesel Motor, Mechanic Heavy-Duty Vehicle, Mechanic Light Vehicle, Mechanic Motor General, Mechanic Motorcycle, Electrician Automotive 

3. Metal Fitters & Machinists

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Job Overview: Metal fitters and machinists7 are experts in fitting and assembling metal parts into various products. They also set up and operate machining tools such as those used in the metal, textile, electronics, and plastic industries. 

Average Salary:  

  • Metal Fitter – $35.27/hr 
  • Machinist – $35.76/hr 

Requirements: 

  • Equivalent of AQF Certificate III including at least two years of on-the-job training; or AQF Certificate IV; or at least 3 years of equivalent experience in the same field 
  • Some employers may require relevant experience or on-the-job training in addition to the formal qualification 

Job Variations: Technician Mechanical, Technician Plastic, Technician Electronic, Technician Maintenance, Fitter General, Fitter Machinist, Fitter Turner, Fitter Mechanical 

4. Vehicle Painters & Panel Beaters

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Job Overview: Unlike their mechanic counterparts, vehicle painters8 and panel beaters9 mainly work on the exterior bodies of large or small vehicles. Panel beaters repair the metal, fiberglass, and plastic bodies of vehicles. Meanwhile, vehicle painters would then remove the rough spots and apply paint to make them look new. 

Average Salary:  

  • Vehicle Painter – $37.45/hr 
  • Panel Beater – $30.01/hr 

Requirements: 

  • Equivalent of AQF Certificate III including at least two years of on-the-job training; or AQF Certificate IV; or at least 3 years of equivalent experience in the same field 
  • Professional registration or licensing may be required 
  • Some employers may require relevant experience or on-the-job training in addition to the formal qualification 

Job Variations: Beater Panel, Body Builder Vehicle, Painter Automotive, Painter Auto Spray, Painter Spray Vehicle 

5. Meat Boners, Slicers, and Slaughterers

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Job Overview: Working in slaughterhouses, meat workers10 like butchers are hired to turn livestock into raw meat products. Their tasks include operating machines to turn carcasses into meat cuts, separating fat and tissue around the bones, and scraping and washing the meat. 

Average Salary:  

  • Meat Boner – $21.38/hr 
  • Meat Cutter – $22.79/hr 

Requirements: 

  • Equivalent of AQF Certificate II or III (ANZSCO Skill Level 4); or at least 1 year of equivalent experience in the same field 
  • Some employers may require relevant experience or on-the-job training in addition to the formal qualification 

Job Variations: Worker Abattoir, Worker Meat, Worker Meat/Butcher, Worker Skilled Meat  

6. Livestock Farmers

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Job Overview: Laborers who help operate livestock farms, such as sheep stations and piggeries, are also in demand in Australia. Livestock farmers11 help breed and raise livestock, maintain container fences, and organize transportation for livestock sales as part of their normal activities. 

Average Salary:  

  • Livestock farmers get around minimum wage ($20.33/hr) 

Requirements: 

  • Equivalent skill of a bachelor’s degree or higher qualification in a related field; or at least five years of relevant experience in the same field 
  • Some employers may require relevant experience or on-the-job training in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO skill level 1) 

Job Variations: Farmer Dairy Cattle, Farmer Pig, Stockperson, Stockperson Senior Piggery  

7. Chefs & Cooks

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Job Overview: Food trades workers, such as chefs12 and cooks13, are also in demand to help fill the gap in Australia’s food service establishments. Chefs plan and organize the menu and food preparation in these establishments. They also lead the cooks who help the chef in preparing and cooking various kinds of dishes. 

Average Salary:  

  • Chefs – $27.87/hr 
  • Cooks – $21.62/hr 

Requirements: 

  • For chefs: Equivalent of AQF Associate Degree, Advanced Diploma or Diploma (ANZSCO Skill Level 2); or at least three years of relevant experience in the same field 
  • For cooks: Equivalent of AQF Certificate III including at least two years of on-the-job training; or AQF Certificate IV; or at least 3 years of equivalent experience in the same field 

Job Variations: Chef de Partie, Chef Sous  

8. Occupational Therapists

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Job Overview: Occupational therapists14 provide therapy for people with illnesses or disabilities to help them perform their daily activities better. They assess their client’s whole capabilities, from physical to emotional, so that they can prescribe a therapy that meets their needs. They may be assigned to home, work, or school environments, as needed. 

Average Salary:  

  • Occupational Therapist – $52.71/hr 

Requirements: 

  • Equivalent skill of a bachelor’s degree or higher qualification in the occupational therapy field (ANZSCO Skill Level 1) 
  • Professional registration or licensing may be required 

9. Software Engineers

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Job Overview: Software engineers or application programmers15 design and develop computer programs depending on the needs of their employers or clients. A software engineer would be adept at evaluating what a program needs, creating a roadmap to develop the said program, and doing the actual coding and debugging work. 

Average Salary:  

  • Software Engineer – $70.76/hr 

Requirements: 

  • Equivalent skill of a bachelor’s degree or higher qualification in the same field; or at least five years of relevant experience in the same field 
  • Some employers may require relevant experience or on-the-job training in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO skill level 1) 

10. Mechanical Engineers

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Job Overview: Mechanical engineers16 plan, design, and oversee the operation and maintenance of machinery and other kinds of mechanical installations. They must know how to design machines and components, establish manufacturing and installation standards, and supervise the maintenance of plant buildings and equipment. 

Average Salary:  

  • Mechanical Engineer – $61.07/hr 

Requirements: 

  • Equivalent skill of a bachelor’s degree or higher qualification in the field 
  • Some employers may require relevant experience or on-the-job training in addition to the formal qualification (ANZSCO skill level 1) 
  • Professional registration or licensing may be required 

Job Variations: Engineer Mechanical Technician, Engineer Mechanical Draftsman, Engineering Technicians Mechanical, Engineer Mechanical/Aircraft Maintenance  

 

Different Pathways To Get Work in Australia

There are a few different pathways to get work in Australia. Direct hire pathways are usually very competitive due to the limited slots, and also have complicated processes. Meanwhile, going through a POEA-accredited agency is much simpler but you may not find the job that you want there. 

Here are the primary methods to find work in Australia: 

1. SkillSelect

SkillSelect is an immigration program by the Australian Department of Home Affairs. It is considered a direct-hire method where you can send an expression of interest (EOI) to join the program through the department’s website17. They will then match you with an appropriate employer based on the employer’s needs. 

To be eligible, your profession must be on the skilled occupation list18. There is a search bar at the bottom of that page that you can use to see if your profession is on the list. 

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Aside from the occupations, you can also see the corresponding ANZSCO code, visa, and assessment authority which differ for each profession. If you click on the ANZSCO code link, you will be taken to a page that shows more details of the job. 

When you send your EOI, you can select the visa that you want to apply for. Your skills, credentials, age, and other relevant factors will be assessed through a points-based system. The higher your points, the higher the chance of you being invited. 

The main drawback to this system is that it is very competitive and if you do not get enough points, you may not even be considered. Based on January 2022 data from the SkillSelect database, only 1% of applicants get invited. 

Aside from that, since SkillSelect is a direct-hire pathway, it also means that when you do get hired you need to coordinate with Australian and Philippine government agencies to get your employment processed.

If you do decide that this is the path for you, make sure to do a manual computation of your possible points first. This way, you have an idea of what you can improve on before you pay an assessment authority to formally do it for you. 

2. Online Job Boards

Online job boards such as Seek and CareerOne are also available as a direct-hire pathway for you. You can also find job postings on social media for professionals, such as LinkedIn. 

However, please note that POEA currently imposes a direct-hire ban19 with very few exemptions. If you do get hired directly by an employer, then you would still need to get your employer accredited by POEA. You would also need to coordinate with a POEA-accredited agency so that they can handle your recruitment. It takes a lot of time and work that may eventually put off your prospective employer. 

3. POEA-Accredited Agencies

This is usually the simplest way to get work in other countries such as Australia, New Zealand, Japan, and Canada. These are not direct-hire jobs, so you don’t have to go through the complicated process of getting one approved. 

Before these jobs are listed, POEA already validates them to ensure that OFWs are protected from scams, illegal recruitment, and other horrible labor practices. Agencies also go through an accreditation process and if they fail to comply with POEA’s standards, then their licenses will be revoked. 

 

How To Work in Australia: A Step-by-Step Guide

1. Apply for Work in Australia Through a POEA-Accredited Agency

Before you apply, you need to check if there are jobs available for the professions you want. You can check the list at the top of this guide or go through the POEA database yourself.

If you want to check the database, just choose Australia from the drop-down box. 

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Upon clicking the Submit button, you’ll be taken to the database where you can see the available jobs, the number of slots available, and the date the job was posted. 

Once you find a job that you want, you need to check if it also appears in Australia’s skilled occupation list. Just type the name of the job in the search bar at the bottom of the page. 

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It’s important to validate that the job you want is part of the list so that you don’t waste your time or money. You can also use the ANZSCO link next to the job name to learn more about the job. 

After that, you need to check if the agency offering the job you want has a valid license. You can do this easily by looking through POEA’s agency database. Just type a part of the agency’s name in the search bar and a result like the one shown below will show up. 

work in australia for filipino 4

Before you contact the agency, make sure to update your resume and prepare for an interview. You want to put your best foot forward even if you are only talking to the agency. After all, they will be the ones to recommend you to an employer. 

Once you are done preparing, contact the agency and ask them about the requirements and next steps. 

2. Get Your Australian Work Visa

After contacting your agency, it’s a good idea to research your visa options while waiting for progress in your application. Your visa options are dependent on the job you are applying for. 

a. Check Your Visa Options

To check what work visas are available for you, you just need to go to the skilled occupation list again. If you search for your job, you can see the visa/s you can apply for listed under the 3rd column. 

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If you plan to become a permanent resident in Australia, then you should look for the following work visas: 

Permanent Work Visas Details
189 Skilled Independent (Points-Tested Stream)20You should be invited to apply for this permanent work visa and satisfy the points test. With this visa, you can work and study anywhere in Australia. It costs from $4,115 and takes anywhere from 53 days to 36 months to process. 
190 Skilled Nominated (Points-Tested Stream)21This visa is almost the same as 189 except that an Australian state or territory must sponsor you. Meaning, you may have some obligations to meet with regards to your sponsor such as working in their state or territory. It also costs from $4,115 but takes anywhere from 4 months to 22 months to process. 
Temporary Work Visas (That Can Lead to Permanent Residence) Details
482 Temporary Skill Shortage (Medium Term Stream)22The medium-term stream version of the 482 work visa lets you stay for up to 4 years. The job you are applying for must be on the Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) or the Regional Occupation List (ROL). You can check this on the skilled occupation list. It costs from $2,690 and may take anywhere from 33 days to 7 months to process. If you do get this visa, you may choose from the next two options for a subsequent permanent visa.
186 Employer Nomination Scheme (Temporary Residence Transition Stream)23This visa requires you to work with an Australian employer for at least 3 years. With this visa, you can live, work and study in Australia indefinitely as well as invite your family over. It costs from $4,115 and takes 4 months to 20 months to process. 
187 Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (Temporary Residence Transition Stream)24This visa is similar to 186 except that it requires you to work and live in regional Australia. It also has a shorter processing time from 3 months to 19 months. 

However, please do note that this is not a guaranteed way to get a permanent work visa. Both of the last two visas in the table above require a nomination from your employer which means it will depend on your work performance and relationship with them. 

Provisional Work Visas Details
491 Skilled Work Regional (Provisional)25This visa is for skilled workers who have been invited to apply by a state or territory, a government agency, or an eligible relative. You also have to satisfy the points requirement. With this visa, you can stay in Australia for 5 years and apply as a permanent resident after 3 years. It costs from $4,115 and can take 78 days to 20 months to process. 
494 Employer-Sponsored Regional (Provisional) Employer-Sponsored Stream26You can only work for your sponsor employer or associated entity with this visa. You can also only live, study, and work in your designated regional area of Australia. It is valid for 5 years and you can apply as a permanent resident after 3 years. It costs from $4,115 and can take 49 days to 8 months to process. 

Note that these work visas may not be the only options available to you. The Department of Home Affairs adds or removes work visas depending on the needs of their country. 

There are more than 40 work visas listed on their website and it can be overwhelming to sift through. Thankfully, you can always use the visa finder on their web page to help you navigate through your options. You can also consult with your recruitment agency regarding the best option for you.

b. Take a Language Test

Each visa has a different language test score requirement that you can check through their respective visa pages. 

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For example, the medium-term stream of 482 Temporary Skill Shortage visa requires an overall band score of 5 and no score lower than 5 in their IELTS results. Meanwhile, the employer-sponsored stream of 494 Employer-Sponsored Regional (Provisional) visa requires at least 6 on each of the 4 components of the IELTS. 

c. Get Your Skills and Credentials Assessed

Each job has a different assessing authority assigned to it. You can easily check this through the skilled occupation list

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The Australian Department of Home Affairs will only accept a skills assessment issued by the relevant assessing authority. So, make sure to work with the correct one. 

Each assessment authority has its own processes and timelines. They also have different fees. So, you’ll need to do your own research or ask your agency about the steps you need to take. 

d. Avoid Work Visa Scams

Lastly, be wary of people who might take advantage of you for wanting to work in Australia. There are a number of scams out there and in order to protect yourself you need to: 

  • Know your workplace rights and your employer’s obligations27 to you 
  • Know that sponsors asking to be paid for visa sponsorship is an illegal practice 
  • Know that you can report any scams that you encounter to the Fair Work Ombudsman and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) 

3. Prepare for the Move to Australia

After getting your visa, you can now start to prepare for your move to Australia. 

  • Buy a document holder where you can keep your passport, work visa, contract, and other important items safe. You can also check the Australian Border Force website for the list of prohibited items so that you can get into the country without any hiccups. 
  • Do your research on the weather in the state or territory that you will be living in. Because Australia is so vast, weather is different depending on the location. For example, the northern sections of Australia have a more tropical climate. Meanwhile, those in the south have milder summers and rainy winters. Prepare your luggage accordingly. 
  • It’s important to already have a place to stay when you land in the country, especially after a long flight. For reference, the flight from Manila to Sydney takes more than 8 hours. So, make sure to secure your accommodations before you leave. 
  • Carry enough cash in AUD or USD for your first few weeks of staying in Australia. While it’s not that hard to open a bank account there, it’s best to be prepared for any unexpected events. You can also try to find out if any digital options are available to you, so you can send money from the Philippines to Australia freely. 
  • Make sure to practice not only your English speaking and writing skills but also your listening skills. Australian English is closer to British English and may be slightly different from what you are used to. If you can, listen to Australian videos online so you can understand their accent and vocabulary better. 
  • You may want to start networking with other Filipinos living in Australia through forums such as the Pinoy Australia Information Forum. Not only will you get crucial tips on what you should bring, but you may also be able to make a friend there before you even leave on your journey. 

4. Arrive in Australia

Once you arrive in Australia, make sure to do the following things so that you can live comfortably and be legally compliant there: 

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  • Get your Tax File Number (TFN) from a nearby branch of the Australian Tax Office (ATO) or through their online application form. Depending on the visa you received, you can be classified as a permanent migrant or temporary worker. However, they have the same tax obligations that follow the resident income tax rates28. The main difference in tax obligation for a permanent and temporary worker is that a temporary worker is not required to pay the Medicare levy. 
  • If you arrive in Australia as a temporary worker, you do not have access to Medicare privileges yet. So, you should probably get your own private insurance to help you save money when you need medical attention. 
  • Make sure to coordinate with your employer if they’ll open a bank account for your payroll. But if you have to open one on your own, there’s no problem since opening a bank account in Australia is easy and inexpensive. The four big banks (i.e., National Australia Bank, Commonwealth Bank, ANZ Bank, and Westpac) all allow non-residents to open accounts with them.  
  • Experience the renowned Australian laid-back culture for yourself. Try to see if there are local sports clubs or social associations that pique your interest. If you join one of them, you can learn more about the Australian culture as well as integrate yourself into the community much easier. 
  • Prepare yourself for dangerous animals and natural disasters. Most local government councils in Australia have an emergency warning system in place. Make sure you know how these work so that you can respond accordingly if the need arises. 
  • If you have a temporary or provisional work visa, it’s also a good time to check what you need to work on to eventually get a permanent visa. For example, if you are working towards getting the 186 Employer Nomination scheme visa, find out how you can raise your chances. That way, you are working towards a goal and won’t be blindsided. 
 

The Advantages of Working in Australia

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Working and living in Australia definitely has benefits for Filipinos aspiring for a better life. If you plan on working there, here are some advantages that you can expect: 

1. Top-Tier Standard of Living

Based on a 2020 report from the United Nations29, Australia ranks 8th in the world on the Human Development Index (HDI). HDI measures life expectancy, access to knowledge, and a decent standard of living. Australia has also consistently ranked among the top 10 since the 1990s. 

2. Better Compensation

The current national minimum wage in Australia is $20.33/hr30 (AUD) or $162.64 for an 8-hour workday. This is equivalent to about PHP 6,286.36 which is about 11 times more than the minimum wage in Manila. If you find yourself in a job that’s in demand, you will likely be compensated much more. 

3. Affordable, Quality Healthcare

Medicare, Australia’s universal health insurance scheme, will be available to you once you become a permanent resident in Australia. By getting Medicare, you will have access to free or low-cost healthcare options in Australia’s public healthcare systems. You can also opt to get private health insurance once you enter the country as a temporary worker. 

4. Abundant Filipino Communities

With Filipinos being the 5th largest migrant population in Australia, it’s no surprise that there are a healthy amount of Filipino communities31 that you can join. There are communities for specific professions, regional areas, sports, and more. By joining one, you will be able to adjust to life in Australia much more smoothly. There are even community websites, such as the Pinoy Australia Information Forum, dedicated to helping fellow Filipinos with their move. 

5. Great for Filipinos Active in Sports

Australians live a very active lifestyle and enjoy many different kinds of sports. If you are active in sports yourself, you can join local sports clubs and build a connection with others in your community. They have clubs for basketball, the Filipino favorite, as well as rugby, soccer, cricket, and many others. 

6. Laid-Back Lifestyle & Love of Nature

Well-known for a relaxed and casual attitude, Australians work hard then play hard right after. Working hours in Australia are capped at 38 hours per week32 by law. If you dream of an actual work-life balance, then you might just achieve it in Australia. And what better way to use your free time than to explore the natural beauty of the country. 

Related: How To Apply for an Australian Tourist Visa

 

The Disadvantages of Working in Australia

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No country is perfect for everyone. There are also some disadvantages of working in Australia that may be a deal-breaker for you. To give you a clear picture, here are a few examples: 

1. Expensive Living Expenses

According to Numbeo33, the cost of living in Australia is on average 120% higher than in the Philippines. They also estimate rent to be three times more expensive. That’s why when you are considering taking a job or not, make sure to compute your actual take-home pay so that you can accurately gauge whether the income is worth the move or not. Don’t forget to include your taxes. 

2. Natural Disasters & Dangerous Animals

From bushfires to floods, Australia has been racked by natural disasters year on year. According to a report by Deloitte Access Economics34, natural disasters cost Australia an average of $38 billion per year. So, make sure you are prepared for these scenarios when you go there. Lastly, don’t forget to ask the locals about the dangerous wildlife in the area. 

3. Interstate Travel Is Time-Consuming

Australia has a lot of top-tier destinations, such as modern cities and beautiful seascapes; however, they are often far from each other. For reference, Melbourne is almost 900 kilometers away from Sydney. It takes almost half a day if you are traveling by car or train. If you want to get there fast, you need to take a plane. 

4. Expensive Cross-Country Travel

If you plan to use your savings to travel a lot, then know that airfare from Australia to popular travel destination countries, such as Japan, can be very expensive. This is because Australia is located far away in the Southern Hemisphere. However, Bali, Indonesia, and New Zealand are reasonably close. 

 

Life in Australia for Filipinos: A Brief History & Overview

The first recorded Filipinos in Australia were in the 1870s35 when they worked as seamen, traders, and pearl divers around Queensland and Western Australia.

By 1901, a total of 690 Filipinos were now living in Australia. This number would stagnate due to the introduction of the White Australia Policy36 in the same year. 

Australia and the Philippines also have military ties37 as countries that fought together during the Second World War

After easing immigration policies in 1952, Filipino tradesmen and nurses were recruited to contribute to the growth of Australia. The declaration of martial law in the Philippines in 1972 also accelerated the movement of Filipinos to other countries, including Australia. 

By the early 2000s, there were more than 100,000 Philippine-born migrants in the country. Fast forward to 2017, about 1 in 10 Filipino OFWs now choose Australia38 as their destination. 

As of 2019, Filipinos remain the fifth largest migrant group in Australia, with the population increasing year on year. The state of New South Wales has the greatest number of Filipinos, followed by Victoria, Queensland, Western Australian, and South Australia. 

Because most Filipino migrants are invited to the country to help with the labor shortage, almost 75% of Filipino migrants are actively working39. And, about 4 in 10 Filipinos are employed in a skilled trade, managerial, or professional occupation. 

 

Tips and Warnings

1. Australia’s borders have reopened; however, there are rules in place for the prevention of COVID-19

If you are traveling by plane, then you are required to submit a Digital Passenger Declaration (DPD)40 within 72 hours before your flight to Australia. 

To enter Australia, you must provide evidence that you are fully vaccinated41 with any of the accepted brands, namely: AstraZeneca Vaxzevria, AstraZeneca Covishield, Pfizer/Biontech Comirnaty, Moderna Spikevax or Takeda, Sinovac Coronavac, Bharat Biotech Covaxin, Sinopharm BBIBP-CorV, Gamaleya Research Institute Sputnik V, or Novavax/Biocelect Nuvaxovid.

If you are not vaccinated due to medical reasons42, you also need to prepare ample evidence. 

2. Keep yourself updated on the latest job and agency scams

You can do this by following POEA’s social media pages. Some common signs that a job is a scam are: 

  • There are no details about the job, and they refuse to provide more information. 
  • There is no information about their company on the internet. They also have no website or social media pages. 
  • They are asking you to pay money first before you can get hired. 
  • They contacted you spontaneously when you didn’t apply to them. This is a common tactic of scammers who steal your identity. 
 

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Do I have to pay a placement fee to an agency to get work in Australia?

Placement fees for work in Australia through a POEA-accredited agency are on a case-to-case basis. These agencies are allowed to charge a placement fee, but it must not exceed one month’s worth of your salary as indicated on your contract with your Australian employer. 

Some recruitment agencies may not charge a placement fee at all since they get their fees solely from foreign employers. In cases where you think the recruitment agency is charging you excessively, you can contact POEA for assistance. 

2. How much will it cost to get work in Australia through a POEA-accredited agency?

Aside from the placement fee, recruitment agencies don’t really charge anything else to help you find work in Australia. 

The other costs that you will pay for are for Philippine government agencies, language testing, skills assessment authorities, and the Australian government. 

Here’s a quick breakdown of these costs: 

Please note that these are just estimates and fees may change without prior notice. 

3. Can I apply for a job directly to Australian employers?

According to Section 123 of POEA’s rules and regulations43, there is currently a ban on direct hiring. Except for a few exceptions, Australian employers and agencies are required by POEA to course their recruitment through accredited agencies44

It’s true that you can apply directly through SkillSelect or online job boards. However, if you do get hired through them, you and your Australian employer will still need to coordinate with various Philippine and Australian government agencies so that your employment can push through. 

4. Are there jobs through POEA-accredited agencies that can lead to a permanent visa?

Yes, some of the jobs that you can get through POEA-accredited agencies are listed under Australia’s skilled occupation list. Meaning, they are looking to hire migrant workers to address shortages in those occupations. 

You can check the visas available for a particular job by using the search function on the page for the skilled occupation list

work in australia for filipino 9

You are looking for jobs where you can apply for a permanent visa such as 189 or 190. But some temporary visas (482) and provisional visas (491 or 494) can also lead to a permanent visa. 

5. Can I apply for work in Australia even without a visa?

It’s actually normal to apply for work first before getting a visa. One of the requirements for getting most of the available work visas in Australia is an employment contract. And you can’t enter the country without a valid visa. 

Note that it’s best to apply with a plan in mind especially if you want your work in Australia to lead to permanent residence. Please check “2. Getting Your Australian Work Visa” in the How to Work in Australia section above.

6. Can I work in Australia without taking a language test?

No. Working visas in Australia have a minimum English language proficiency requirement that you have to meet. Depending on the visa, the requirements are also different, so you need to check the website of the Australian Department of Home Affairs

For example, a permanent visa Skilled Nominated (subclass 190) requires at least a 6 score45 in all 4 of the IELTS components. Meanwhile, the medium-term stream of temporary visa TSS (subclass 482) requires at least a 5 overall band score46 and a minimum 5 score in each component in IELTS. 

7. Are there jobs in Australia available for Filipinos without work experience?

In Australia, it’s very difficult to find jobs for foreign workers without any work experience. Even typical laborer jobs in farms require a certain degree of competency. Australians, after all, take pride in their agricultural industry. 

For example, livestock farmers must have a bachelor’s degree or higher in the related field. Otherwise, at least 5 years of experience is needed as a substitute requirement. 

The other route for people without experience is to study and work in Australia. However, you need to choose a field that is on the skilled occupation list. After studying in Australia, you can then apply for the Temporary Graduate Visa (Subclass 485)47. This lets you work in Australia and gives you time to apply for a permanent visa related to your work. 

8. How is Australian English different from the English we use in the Philippines?

Australian English is closer to British English in both vocabulary and spelling. Meanwhile, Philippine English is closer to American English. However, as long as you have sufficient English skills, you’ll be able to understand one another without any big problems. 

They use a lot of slang that you’ll likely learn as you work there. It’s probably more important to get used to their accent rather than worrying about the differences in vocabulary.  

You can try listening to any of the available Australian media online as practice. That way, you can comfortably have a conversation with the people you meet there once you arrive. 

9. Can a Filipino get a working holiday visa in Australia?

All the short-stay work visas48 are not available for Filipino citizens. These include the Work and Holiday visa (subclass 462) and Working Holiday visa (subclass 417) which are only available to select countries.  

However, if you are a Filipino who is a citizen and passport holder of the allowed countries, then you may be able to apply for these visas. The list of countries is different for visas 462 and 417 so you need to check it on their website. 

10. Is it easy for Filipinos to find a job in Australia?

Finding a job in Australia as a foreign worker takes a lot of time and hard work. It’s very competitive and you need to make sure that you stand out from the other applicants from all over the world. 

To give you an idea of the odds, data from the SkillSelect program is available online. A total number of 109,451 applications were submitted for the Skilled Nominated visa (subclass 190) as of January 2022. Of those, only 1100 were invited to Australia or just 1% of the total applications. 

That’s why working with a POEA-accredited agency that has experience sending Filipino workers to Australia is so beneficial. They already know the processes so they can guide you step by step.

 

References

  1. Masinag, R. (2021). 310,000 Filipino migrants are calling Australia their second home, new data reveals. Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.sbs.com.au/language/english/310-000-filipino-migrants-are-calling-australia-their-second-home-new-data-reveals
  2. Country profile – Philippines. (2021). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/research-and-statistics/statistics/country-profiles/profiles/philippines
  3. Australia ready to welcome back skilled migrant workers. (2022). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/life/2022-02-22-native-australia-ready-to-welcome-back-skilled-migrant-workers/
  4. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, 2006 – Unit Group 3223 Structural Steel and Welding Trades Workers. (2006). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/0/51CA65855B96BB86CA2571E2008354D4?opendocument
  5. Welder Salary Australia. (2022). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.salaryexpert.com/salary/job/welder/australia
  6. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, Revision 1 – Minor Group 321 Automotive Electricians and Mechanics. (2009). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/Product+Lookup/3D9E7EAF48EF4266CA2575DF002DA6FA?opendocument
  7. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, Revision 1 – Unit Group 3232 Metal Fitters and Machinists. (2009). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/latestproducts/E756DD230C3B94C1CA2575DF002DA786?opendocument
  8. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, 2006 – Unit Group 3243 Vehicle Painters. (2006). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/0/A200F3036C98756BCA2571E2008354DD?opendocument
  9. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, 2006 – Unit Group 3241 Panelbeaters. (2006). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/0/713BF345B7A34F51CA2571E2008354DB?opendocument
  10. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, Revision 1 – Unit Group 8312 Meat Boners and Slicers, and Slaughterers. (2009). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/latestproducts/5DF7B56C6D7DCA82CA2575DF002DA742?opendocument
  11. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, Revision 1 – Unit Group 1213 Livestock Farmers. (2009). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/Latestproducts/A5F3A3E9DE8885E7CA2575DF002DA790?opendocument
  12. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, Revision 1 – Unit Group 3513 Chefs. (2009). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/Product+Lookup/1220.0~First+Edition,+Revision+1~Chapter~UNIT+GROUP+3513+Chefs
  13. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, Revision 1 – Unit Group 3514 Cooks. (2009). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/Previousproducts/171A4AC9F7BF1501CA2575DF002DA793?opendocument
  14. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, Revision 1 – Unit Group 2524 Occupational Therapists. (2009). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/Product+Lookup/308114CEA4967D30CA2575DF002DA71D?opendocument
  15. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, 2006 – Unit Group 2613 Software and Applications Programmers. (2006). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/[email protected]/Product+Lookup/1220.0~2006~Chapter~UNIT+GROUP+2613+Software+and+Applications+Programmers
  16. Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations, First Edition, Revision 1 – Unit Group 2335 Industrial, Mechanical and Production Engineers. (2009). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://www.abs.gov.au/Ausstats/[email protected]/Latestproducts/9C5DFE35140635F7CA2575DF002DA72C?opendocument
  17. Skillselect. (2021). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/working-in-australia/skillselect
  18. Skilled occupation list. (2021). Retrieved 23 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/working-in-australia/skill-occupation-list
  19. Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA). (2018). POEA Memorandum Circular No. 08 Series of 2018. Mandaluyong City.
  20. Skilled Independent visa (subclass 189) Points-tested stream. (2022). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-independent-189/points-tested
  21. Subclass 190 Skilled Nominated Visa. (2022). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-nominated-190
  22. Temporary Skill Shortage Visa (Subclass 482) Medium-term Stream. (2022). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/temporary-skill-shortage-482/medium-term-stream
  23. Employer Nomination Scheme (Subclass 186) Temporary Residence Transition Stream. (2022). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/employer-nomination-scheme-186/temporary-residence-transition-stream
  24. Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme Visa (Subclass 187) Temporary Residence Transition Stream. (2022). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/regional-sponsor-migration-scheme-187/temporary-residence-transistion-stream
  25. Subclass 491 – Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) Visa – Main applicant. (2022). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-work-regional-provisional-491/application
  26. Skilled Employer-Sponsored Regional (Provisional) Visa (Subclass 494) Employer-Sponsored Stream. (2022). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/skilled-employer-sponsored-regional-494/employer-sponsored-stream
  27. Visa holders and migrant workers – workplace rights and entitlements. Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://www.fairwork.gov.au/tools-and-resources/fact-sheets/rights-and-obligations/visa-holders-and-migrant-workers-workplace-rights-and-entitlements
  28. Individual income tax rates. (2021). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://www.ato.gov.au/rates/individual-income-tax-rates/
  29. Latest Human Development Index Ranking. (2020). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://hdr.undp.org/en/content/latest-human-development-index-ranking
  30. Minimum wages. Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://www.fairwork.gov.au/tools-and-resources/fact-sheets/minimum-workplace-entitlements/minimum-wages
  31. Embassy of the Philippines in Canberra, Australia. (2021). Filipino Community Organizations in Australia (As of 2021) [PDF]. Retrieved from https://dms.philembassy.org.au/index.php/website/the-philippines/742-directory-of-filipino-communities-in-australia-2/file
  32. Hours of work. Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://www.fairwork.gov.au/employment-conditions/hours-of-work-breaks-and-rosters/hours-of-work
  33. Cost of Living in Australia. (2022). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/country_result.jsp?country=Australia
  34. Natural Disasters estimated to cost Australia $73 billion per year by 2060. (2021). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://www.iag.com.au/newsroom/community/natural-disasters-estimated-cost-australia-73-billion-year-2060
  35. Ancestry – Filipino. Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://multiculturalnsw.id.com.au/multiculturalnsw/ancestry-introduction?COIID=248
  36. Heanue, S. (2017). White Australia Policy: Documents reveal personal stories of life under Immigration Restriction Act. Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-04/white-australia-policy-project-transcribes-history/8868680
  37. Australian Philippine History and Memorials. Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://philippines.embassy.gov.au/mnla/defence-history.html
  38. Bevan, K. (2018). Why so many Filipinos choose Australia as their second home. Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://www.worldremit.com/en/stories/story/2018/01/26/filipinos-australia
  39. Filipinos in Australia. Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://culturalatlas.sbs.com.au/filipino-culture/filipino-culture-filipinos-in-australia
  40. Digital Passenger Declaration. (2022). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/covid19/digital-passenger-declaration
  41. Vaccination and testing. (2022). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/covid19/vaccination-testing#content-index-2
  42. Unvaccinated international travellers. (2022). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/covid19/unvaccinated-travellers/temp-visa-holders/entering-and-transiting-australia
  43. Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA). (2016). Revised POEA Rules and Regulations Governing the Recruitment and Employment of Land-based Overseas Filipino Workers of 2016 [PDF]. Retrieved from https://www.poea.gov.ph/laws&rules/files/Revised%20POEA%20Rules%20And%20Regulations.pdf
  44. Embassy of The Philippines in Australia. Guide for Australian Employers on Hiring Filipino Workers and Professionals [PDF]. Retrieved from https://dms.philembassy.org.au/index.php/website/latest/polo-1/69-guide-for-australian-employers-on-hiring-filipino-workers-and-professionals/file
  45. Competent English. (2022). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/help-support/meeting-our-requirements/english-language/competent-english
  46. English proficiency (subclass 482). (2020). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/temporary-skill-shortage-482/sufficient-english
  47. Subclass 485 Temporary Graduate visa. (2021). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/getting-a-visa/visa-listing/temporary-graduate-485
  48. Short stay work visas. (2019). Retrieved 24 March 2022, from https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/visas/working-in-australia/short-stay-work-visas

Rod Michael Perez

Rod Michael Perez is a freelance writer with over 7 years of experience in writing long-form articles, ad copy, and SEO content for local and foreign clients. He is also an aspiring startup founder and believes that the Philippines could be the next hub for startup culture. He takes care of his dog, a poodle-Shih Tzu hybrid, in his spare time.

One thought on “How To Get a Job in Australia (Plus Latest POEA Jobs)

  1. Hi,

    I’m interested to work in Australia. I’m hard working, flexible and very eager to learn and experience new things . I have background working experience with foreign country true my customer service experience and my human resource experience locally with my foreign superior officers. When it comes to my manual labor skills I was able to work as factory before I entered college in bag and electronics manufacturing company . I hope that you can consider me to work in your country. Thanks you!

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