NMAT Verbal Practice Test

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Part I: Word Analogies.

Directions: The questions that follow have two pairs of words. Analyze the first pairing and figure out how they’re related to each other. The second pair is related to each other in the same way as the first pair. Choose the missing word from the given choices.

 

1. EQUANIMITY : HARRIED :: MODERATION :

A. INFAMOUS

B. LOGICAL

C. DISSOLUTE

D. URBANE

 

2. LACONIC : WORDS :: PARCHED :

A. HEAT

B. MOISTURE

C. DESERT

D. VAPID

 

3. WHEAT : CHAFF :: QUALITY :

A. THRESH

B. WHOLE

C. INADEQUACY

D. WORTH

 

4. CUSHION : SOFA :: SHELF :

A. LEDGE

B. BOOKCASE

C. STORAGE

D. FRAME

 

5. MEAN : AVERAGE :: KIND :

A. HURTFUL

B. MEANING

C. VARIETY

D. KINDNESS

 

6. AESOP : FABLE :: HOMER :

A. TEMPLE

B. DONKEY

C. EPIC

D. GREECE

 

7. OUTRAGE : PEEVE :: STRIVE :

A. ATTEMPT

B. CURSE

C. DUEL

D. SHUN

 

8. SLIGHT : HURT :: LAG :

A. TARDINESS

B. BRAGGART

C. HEFT

D. HASTE

 

9. SECRET : FURTIVE :: AUDIBLE :

A. RESONANT

B. NAP

C. SACK

D. RING

 

10. PRIVY : SECRET :: SYMPATHETIC :

A. SPY

B. GRIEF

C. CLANDESTINE

D. JOY

 

Part II: Reading Comprehension.

Directions: This section contains passages from various sources. It will test your ability to understand what you read. Choose the correct answer to each question asked after each passage.

For questions 11 – 18:

A Daily Record

A diary is a daily personal record. In it, the writer is free to record anything at all. This may include events, comments, ideas, reading notes, or any subject on one’s mind. Diaries may be kept for various purposes – to record the experiences of one’s life so as not to forget them, to record ideas that might prove useful, or simply to express oneself through the medium of the printed word. In past centuries people in public life often kept diaries. These have become valuable sources of fact and interpretation for later historians. The private candid observations set down in these personal journals often provide truer pictures of an age than do records or other books, which may have been censored during that time. For the most part, these diaries were never intended to be read by others. The entries were made simply as aids to memory or as a form of relaxation.

In modern times, however, politicians and other people realize that their diaries will likely be read by historians or, in published form, by the public. Thus they may make entries with these readers in mind. As a result, their diaries may lose the confidential, intimate nature of the older ones. On the other hand, their entries may tend to be more complete and self-explanatory. The most famous diary ever written in English was that kept by Samuel Pepys. A civilian official of the British army, Pepys made regular entries between 1660 and 1669. His diary starts at the beginning of the Restoration period in English history and describes many of the court intrigues and scandals of his day. The diary reveals Pepys as a man with many human weaknesses but one who was honest with himself. He wrote his entries in a combined code and shorthand that was not solved until more than 100 years after his death. The most famous diary of the 20th century was published with the simple title Diary of a Young Girl. It was more commonly known as The Diary of Anne Frank. Anne was a young Jewish girl whose diary records the two years her family spent in hiding, mostly in the Netherlands, trying to escape the Nazi persecutors of the Jews. She and her family were finally caught in August 1944. She was imprisoned and died at a concentration camp in Germany in March 1945.

 

11. A diary is

A. a report on world events

B. a daily personal record

C. a documentary

D. None of the above

 

12. The most famous diary ever written in English was kept by

A. Samuel Johnson

B. Samuel Pepys

C. Anne Frank

D. None of the above

 

13. Diary of a Young Girl was written

A. during the civil war

B. in the 1940s

C. during the 19th century.

D. None of the above

 

14. Anne Frank’s diary describes

A. the years her family spent hiding from the Nazis

B. a German concentration camp

C. the life of an average young girl

D. None of the above

 

15. Diaries of the past may give a truer picture of an age than published books because

A. diaries are uncensored

B. published books give only one point of view

C. amateur writers were more thorough than professional writers

D. None of the above

 

16. Today’s diarists may not be as confidential as those in the past because

A. they expect that their diaries will be read by others

B. they have more secrets to hide

C. people today are harsher critics

D. None of the above

 

17. You may conclude from the article that Samuel Pepys wrote his diary in code and shorthand because

A. he was fond of mysteries

B. he did not want his diary to be read by the wrong people

C. he could not write in proper English

D. None of the above

 

18. It is probable that most people keep diaries in order to

A. become famous

B. keep personal records

C. practice their writing skills

D. None of the above

 

For questions 19 – 20:

Many people can recite that E=mc2 and some may even know the value of “c” the constant speed of light in a vacuum (299,792,458 m/s); but was does it really mean? The equation E=mc2 is also known as the mass-equivalence. Simply stated it is the concept that the mass of an object is a measure of its energy content. The mass-energy equivalence arose originally from special relativity as a paradox described by Henri Poincaré. Therefore, Albert Einstein was not the first to propose a mass-energy relationship. However, Einstein was the first scientist to propose the E = mc2 formula and the first to interpret mass-energy equivalence as a fundamental principle that follows from the relativistic symmetries of space and time.

 

19. According to the paragraph “c” is:

A. dangerous from a nuclear standpoint.

B. the constant speed of light in a vacuum.

C. a discovery of Henri Poincaré

D. the mass-energy equivalence.

 

20. Which word best defines the function of the passage?

A. interrogative

B. exclamatory

C. derogative

D. informative

 

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3 thoughts on “NMAT Verbal Practice Test

  • 03/18/2019 at 10:40 am
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    Reply
    • 03/18/2019 at 10:41 am
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      @Alaicah Ambor

      The free PDF copy isn’t finished yet. Be patient.

      Reply
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